Health Research and Outcomes

Below is a list of the available research and scholarly opportunities within the Health Research Outcomes Track.

Health Services and Outcomes Research

Program Overview

The Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research (IU CHSOR) is an IU campus-wide center established in 2003 to advance the science of continually improving healthcare delivery systems. The IU CHSOR mission is to advance the science of transforming the health care system, locally, regionally and nationally. Investigators conduct research to improve the delivery of health care and improve health outcomes. The scholarly opportunities for medical students within The Health Services and Outcomes Research group are varied including: clinical trials, healthcare administration, health economics, and health services research. All of the faculty are experienced mentors who value the addition of medical students to their working groups.

Why is health services research important? The work of health services investigators contributes to the science of translation and practical application, and helps original research findings make a successful journey from scientific evidence to sustainable, wide scale implementation.

Structure of Internship: Medical students will be paired with a faculty mentor and will have the opportunity to conduct an independent project. In nearly all cases, the medical student will have the opportunity to draft a manuscript describing their work which will be submitted for peer-reviewed publication.

IU CHSOR Faculty Research Areas:

Faculty/Research Group Description
Matt Bair Pain clinical trial
Massage intervention to improve pain
Chowdry Bashir Healthcare administration
Dawn Bravata/PRISM QUERI Qualitative research
Vascular risk factor reduction implementation trial
Stroke health services research
Sleep apnea health service research
Patient self-management
Penny Butler Healthcare system redesign projects
Healthcare system engineering
Patti Darbishire Pharmacy health services research
Richard Griffith Healthcare administration
Tom Imperiale GI health services research
Prognostication for colorectal cancer
Nancy Lightner Health economics
Business case analyses
Deb Litzelman Medical education
Population health
Marianne Matthias/ECLIPSE Pain clinical trial
Medical communication
Alissa Russ Medication alerts to reduce errors
Margi Snyder Pharmacy health services research
Chris Suelzer Opioid prescribing
Clinical outcomes in women’s health
Smoking cessation
Patient self-management
Mike Weiner Geroinformatics Health services research related to specialty consultation

Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science MStar Student Internship:

Program Overview: The Center for Health Innovation & Implementation Science (CHIIS) was founded in 2013 through a collaborative effort between the IU School of Medicine and the Indiana Center for Translational Science Institute (CTSI). The mission of the CHIIS is to produce high-quality, patient-centered and cost-effective health care delivery by using the methods and tools of Implementation Science and promoting Innovation.

The Medical Student Internship Program in Implementation Science is designed to help medical students develop the skills needed to translate and implement evidence into practice as clinicians. This program will help students understand the methods and tools of Implementation Science and to apply those tools to a practicum project.

Why is implementation science important? Approximately 25 clinical trials are published each day in the United States, however, statistics show it takes an average of 17 years before evidence-based practices are adopted into routine health care. To fulfill our mission and vision, the CHIIS employs the tools of Implementation Science to provide services and education that enable health care systems, clinicians, and scientists to create meaningful changes to accelerate moving evidence into clinical practice.

Structure of Internship: Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty/health systems leader availability. CHIIS will partner students with affiliated scientist or health systems leader at Regenstrief, CTSI, Eskenazi or IU Health for a broad and comprehensive internship experience. Interns will be asked to design an Implementation project using the CHIIS Implementation Science Tool Kit, aligned with the faculty/health system research area. Interns will be required to attend an Implementation Science & Population Health short courses, and to attend a residency weekend session with the CHIIS Graduate Certificate Program for formal training on Implementation Science methods and tools.

CHIIS Faculty Research Areas

Faculty/Research Group Research Description
Malaz Boustani Dementia, Delirium, and responsible for Implementation Science training for medical students
Nicole Fowler Dementia, Long-term care
Affiliate Faculty
Barbar Khan Delirium, Critical Care
Noll Campbell Pharmacology, Pharmacoepidemiology
Jose Azar Cancer Research
Eric Orman Gastrointestinal Research
Dan Bateman Geriatric Psychiatry
Sophia Wang Psychiatry
Ashley Overely Psychology
Patrick Monahan Biostatistics, Measures, Homelessness
Ben Zarzaur Surgery
Health Systems Affiliates
Victoria Bratcher, IU Health
Juan Guzman, IU Health
Parveen Chand, IU Health
Al Gatmaitan, IU Health
Lisa Harris, Eskenazi
Chris Weaver, Eskenazi

Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Medical Student Internship:

Program Overview:

The Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CCBB) was founded in 2003 in the IU School of Medicine. The CCBB mission is to promote advanced computation and informatics approaches to increase our understanding of normal and disease-associated biological processes, drug development, and therapeutic responses and to educate the next generation of bioinformaticians through direct participation in research activities. The Medical Student Internship Program in the CCBB is designed to teach medical students the skills needed to conduct computational biology and bioinformatics research in both clinical science and basic science. This program will facilitate the understanding of methods and tools used in high through-put omics data analysis and will apply those tools to a practicum project.

Why is bioinformatics so important? Computational biology and bioinformatics are closely integrated with almost all phases of biomedical research, such as disease mechanism and drug target discovery in the basic science research, and biomarker discovery in the clinical research. Its role in the precision medicine research is even more prominent. In this era of “big data”, an enormous amount of public domain omics data resources are becoming a driving force for biomedical research.

Structure of Internship: Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty availability. CCBB will partner students with affiliated scientist at Indiana Institute of Personalized Medicine, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Regenstrief, CTSI, Eskenazi or IU Health for a broad and comprehensive internship experience. Interns will be asked to design a computational biology and bioinformatics project using the tools specific to the selected CCBB faculty lab. Interns will be required to attend this faculty lab meeting and CCBB seminar series for formal training and project development.

Faculty/Research Group Research Description
Li Shen Integrative analysis of multimodal imaging data, cognitive and biomarker data.
Sara Quinney In silico models to better understand factors influencing drug pharmacokinetics and response.
Lang Li Translational biomedical informatics research on drug interactions and precision medicine.
Yunlong Liu Bioinformatics approaches to understanding regulatory mechanisms of gene expression.

Application: Applications for the Health Research Outcomes summer opportunities are due on February 1, 2017. Click here to access the RedCap Application form.

Contact Information: For additional information about the program, please contact Anne Nguyen at annnguye@iu.edu

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